Old 15th September 2004, 23:17   #1
MegaRock
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They take our tax money but don't give us jobs...

This list was published on CNN today and the length of it just stunned me. Workers overseas can do no better of a job than American workers can - they just do it cheaper. While that is ok why after saving 75% or more on labor costs do the price of these products not drop?

Personally if you value your way of living, your job and your country you should not do business with these folks. If these companies want someone to buy their products and services I believe they should look towards those they employ and since they're not in the USA anymore those people are not us.

Enjoy this list, it's long. And George W keep saying there's all these jobs here. At this rate I'm wondering who still employs any of us. Note the list of companies with American in their name yet don't even employ people here.

In addition you might enjoy this article:
http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/09/09/lan...ity/index.html

3M
A. Schulman, Inc.
Aalfs Manufacturing
Aavid Thermal Technologies
Abbott Laboratories
ABC-NACO
Accenture
Access Electronics
Accuride Corporation
Accuride International
Acme Packaging
Adaptec
ADC
Admanco
Adobe Air
Adobe Systems
Admanco
Advanced Energy Industries
Aei Acquisitions
Aetna
Affiliated Computer Services
AFS Technologies
A.G. Edwards
Agere Systems
Agilent Technologies
A.H. Schreiber Co.
AIG
Air Products & ChemicalsÊ
Alamo Rent A Car
Albany International Corp.
Albertson's
Alcoa
Alcoa Fujikura
Allen-Edmonds Shoe Corporation
Allen Systems Group
Allflex USA
Alliance Fiber Optic Products, Inc.
Alliance Semiconductor
Allstate
Alpha Thought Global
Altek
Altria Group
Amazon.com
Ames True Temper
AMD
Americ Disc
American Dawn
American Express
American Fashion
American Greetings
American Household
American Management Systems
American Standard
American Tool
American Uniform Company
Applied Micro Circuits Corp.
Amerigon Incorporated
AMETEK
AMI DODUCO
Amloid Corporation
Amphenol Corporation
Analog Devices
Anchor Glass Container
Anchor Hocking
ANDA Networks
Anderson Electrical Products
Andrew Corporation
Angelica Corporation
Anheuser-Busch
Ansell Health Care
Ansell Protective Products
Anvil Knitwear
AOL
A.O. Smith
Apex Systems
Apparel Ventures, Inc.
Apple
Applied Materials
Applied Micro Circuits Corp.
Arimon Technologies, Inc.
Arkansas General Industries
Ark-Les Corporation
Arlee Home Fashions
Artex International
Art Leather Manufacturing
ArvinMeritor
Asbury Carbons
Asco Power Technologies
Ashland
AstenJohnson
Asyst Technologies
AT&T
AT&T Wireless
Atchison Products, Inc.
A.T. Cross
A.T. Kearney
ATMI-Ecosys Corporation
Augusta Sportswear
Aurafin-OroAmerica
Authentic Fitness Corporation
Automatic Data Processing
Avanade
Avanex
Avaya
Avery Dennison
Axiohm Transaction Solutions
AXT, Inc.
Azima Healthcare Services
B.A.G. Corporation
Bakka
Ball Corporation
Bank of America
Bank of New York
Bank One
Bard Access Systems
Barnes Group
Barth & Dreyfuss of California
Bassett Furniture
Bassler Electric Company
Bausch & Lomb
BBi Enterprises L.P.
Beacon Blankets
BearingPoint
Bear Stearns
BEA Systems
Bechtel
Becton Dickinson
BellSouth
Bemis Manufacturing Co.
Bentley Systems
Berdon LLP
Berne Apparel
Bernhardt Furniture
Besler Electric Company
Best Buy
Bestt Liebco Corporation
Beverly Enterprises
Bijur Lubricating Corp.
Birdair, Inc.
BISSELL
Black & Decker
Black Diamond Equipment
Blauer Manufacturing
Blue Cast Denim
Blyth, Inc.
BMC Software
Bobs Candies
Boeing
Borden Chemical
Bose Corporation
Bourns
Bowater
Braden Manufacturing
Brady Corporation
Briggs Industries
Brinker International
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Bristol Tank & Welding Co.
Brocade
Brooks Automation
Brown Wooten Mills Inc.
Buck Forkardt, Inc.
Bumble Bee
Burle Industries
Burlington House Home Fashions
Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway
&D Technologies
Cadence Design Systems
Cains Pickles
California Cedar Products Company
Camfil Farr
Candle Corporation
Capital Mercury Apparel
Capital One
Cardinal Brands
Cardinal Industries
Carrier
Carris Financial Corp.
Carter's
Caterpillar
C-COR.net
Cellpoint Systems
Cendant
Centis, Inc.
Centurion Wireless Technologies
Cerner Corporation
Charles Schwab
The Cherry Corporation
ChevronTexaco
CIBER
Ciena
Cigna
Circuit City
Cirrus Logic
Cisco Systems
Citigroup
Clear Pine Mouldings
Clorox
CNA
Coastcast Corp.
Coca-Cola
Cognizant Technology Solutions
Coherent, Inc.
Collins & Aikman
Collis, Inc.
Columbia House
Columbia Showcase & Cabinet Company
Columbus McKinnon
Comcast Holdings
Comdial Corporation
CompuServe
Computer Associates
Computer Horizons
Computer Sciences Corporation
Concise Fabricators
Conectl Corporation
Conseco
Consolidated Metro
Consolidated Ventura
Continental Airlines
Convergys
Cooper-Atkins Corporation
Cooper Crouse-Hinds
Cooper Industries
Cooper Power Systems
Cooper Tire & Rubber
Cooper Tools
Cooper Wiring Devices
Copperweld
Cordis Corporation
Corning
Corning Cable Systems
Corning Frequency Control
Countrywide Financial
COVAD Communications
Covansys
Cray, Inc.
Creo Americas
Crompton Corporation
Cross Creek Apparel
Crouzet Corporation
Crown Holdings
CSX
Cummins
Curtis Instruments
Cutler-Hammer
Cypress Semiconductor
Dana Corporation
Daniel Woodhead
Dan River
Data-Ray Corporation
Datex-Ohmeda
Davis Wire Corp.
Daws Manufacturing
Dayton Superior
Dearborn Brass
DeCrane Aircraft
Delco Remy
Dell Computer
Del Monte Foods
DeLong Sportswear
Delphi
Delta Air Lines
Delta Apparel
Direct TV
Discover
DJ Orthopedics
Document Sciences Corporation
Dometic Corp.
Donaldson Company
Dorr-Oliver Eimco USA, Inc.
Douglas Furniture of California
Dow Chemical
Dresser
Dun & Bradstreet
DuPont
DuPont Beaumont Works
Earthlink
Eastman Kodak
Eaton Corporation
Edco, Inc.
Editorial America
Edscha
eFunds
e-Gain Communications Corp.
Egs Electrical Group
Ehlert Tool Company
Elbeco Inc.
Electroglas
Electronic Data Systems
Electronics for Imaging
Electro Technology
Eli Lilly
Elkins Hardwood Dimension
Elmer's Products
E-Loan
EMC
Emerson Electric
Emerson Power Transmission
Emglo Products
Endwave Corporation
Engel Machinery
En Pointe Technologies
Equifax
Ernst & Young
Essilor of America
Ethan Allen
Ethicon
Evenflo
Evergreen Wholesale Florist
Evolving Systems
Evy of California
Exabyte Corporation
Exfo Gnubi Products Group
Expedia
Extrasport
ExxonMobil
Fairfield Manufacturing
Fair Isaac
Fansteel Inc.
Farley's & Sathers Candy Co.
Fasco Industries
Fawn Industries
Fayette Cotton Mill
FCI USA
Fedders Corporation
Federal Mogul
Federated Department Stores
Fellowes
Fender Musical Instruments
Fidelity Investments
Financial Techologies International
Findlay Industries Finotex

First American Title Insurance
First Data
First Index
Fisher Controls
Fisher Hamilton
Fisher-Rosemount Systems
Flowserve
Fluidmaster
Fluor
FMC Corporation
Fontaine International
Ford Motor
Foster Wheeler
Franklin Mint
Franklin Templeton
Freeborders
Friedrich Air Conditioning Co.
Frito Lay
Friwo-Emc
Fruit of the Loom
Garan Manufacturing
Gateway
GE Capital
GE Medical Systems
G.E. Packaged Power
Gemtron Corporation
General Binding Corporation
General Cable Corp.
General Electric
General Mills
General Motors
Generation 2 Worldwide
Genesco
Georgia-Pacific
Gerber Childrenswear
Gillette
Glacier West Sportswear
Global Power Equipment Grp.
GlobespanVirata
Golden Northwest Aluminum
Goldman Sachs
Gold Toe Brands
Goodrich
Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Google
Goss Graphic Systems
Graphic Controls
Graphite Design International
Green Bay Packaging
Greenpoint Mortgage
Greenwood Mills
Grote Industries
Grove U.S. LLC
Guardian Life Insurance
Guilford Mills
Gulfstream Aerospace Corp.
Haggar
Halliburton
Hamilton Beach/Procter-Silex
Hamilton Sundstrand
Harman International Industries
Harper-Wyman Company
The Hartford Financial Services Group
Hasbro Manufacturing Services
Hawk Corporation
Hawker Power Systems, Inc.
Haworth
Headstrong
HealthAxis
Hedstrom
Hein-Werner Corp.
Helen of Troy
Helsapenn Inc.
Hershey
Hewitt Associates
Hewlett-Packard
Hoffman Enclosures, Inc.
Hoffman/New Yorker
The Holmes Group
Home Depot
The HON Company
Honeywell
Hooker Furniture Corporation
HSN
Hubbell Inc.
Hudson Rci
Humana
Hunter Sadler
Hutchinson Sealing Systems, Inc
HyperTech Solutions
IBM
iGate Corporation
Illinois Tool Works
IMI Cornelius
Imi Norgren
Imperial Home Decor Group
Inamed Corporation
Indiana Knitwear Corp.
IndyMac Bancorp
Inflation Systems
Infogain
Ingersoll-Rand
Innodata Isogen
Innova Solutions
Insilco Technologies
Intalco Aluminum Corp.
Intel
InterMetro Industries
International Garment Processors
International Paper
International Steel Wool Corp.
Interroll Corporation
Intesys Technologies
Intuit
Invacare
Iris Graphics, Inc.
Isola Laminate Systems
Iteris Holdings, Inc.
Itronix Corporation
ITT Educational Services
ITT Industries
Jabil Circuit
Jacobs Engineering
Jacuzzi
Jakel, Inc.
JanSport
Jantzen Inc.
JDS Uniphase
Jockey International
John Crane
John Deere
Johns Manville
Johnson & Johnson
Johnson Controls
JPMorgan Chase
J.R. Simplot
Juniper Networks
Justin Brands
K2 Inc.
K&S Interconnect
KANA Software
Kaiser Permanente
Kanbay
Kayby Mills of North Carolina
Keane
Kellogg
Kellwood
Kelly-Springfield Tire Co.
KEMET
KEMET Electronics
Kendall Healthcare
Kendro Laboratory Products
Kenexa
Kentucky Apparel
Kerr-McGee Chemical
KeyCorp
Key Industries
Key Safety Systems
Key Tronic Corp.
Kimberly-Clark
KLA-Tencor
Knight Textile Corp.
Kojo Worldwide Corporation
Kraft Foods
Kulicke and Soffa Industries
Kwikset
LaCrosse Footwear
L.A. Darling Company
Lake Village Industries
Lamb Technicon
Lancer Partnership
Lander Company
Lands' End
Lau Industries
Lawson Software
Layne Christensen
La-Z-Boy
Leach International
Lear Corporation
Leech Tool & Die Works
Legendary Holdings, Inc.
Lehman Brothers
Leoni Wiring Systems
Levi Strauss
Leviton Manufacturing Co.
Lexmark International
Lexstar Technologies
Liebert Corporation
Lifescan
Lillian Vernon
Linksys
Linq Industrial Fabrics, Inc.
Lionbridge Technologies
Lionel
Littelfuse
LiveBridge
LNP Engineering Plastics
Lockheed Martin
Longaberger
LOUD Technologies
Louisiana-Pacific Corporation
Louisville Ladder Group LLC
Lowe's
Lucent
Ludlow Building Products
Lund International
Lyall Alabama
Madill Corporation
Magma Design Automation
Magnequench
Magnetek
Maida Development Co.
Maidenform
Mallinckrodt, Inc.
The Manitowoc Company
Manugistics
Marathon Oil
Marge Carson, Inc.
Marine Accessories Corp.
Maritz
Marko Products, Inc.
Mars, Inc.
Marshall Fields
Master Lock
Masterwork Electronics
Materials Processing, Inc.
Mattell
Maxim Integrated Products
Maxi Switch
Maxtor Corporation
Maxxim Medical
Maytag
McDATA Corporation
McKinsey & Company
MeadWestvaco
Measurement Specialties, Inc.
Mediacopy
Medtronic
Mellon Bank
Mentor Graphics Corp.
*******n Automotive Systems
Merit Abrasive Products
Merrill Corporation
Merrill Lynch
Metasolv
MetLife
Michigan Magnetics
Micro Motion, Inc.
Micron Technology
Microsoft
Midcom Inc.
Midwest Electric Products
Milacron
MKS Instruments
Modern Plastics Technics
Modine Manufacturing
Moen
Money's Foods Us Inc.
Monona Wire Corp.
Monsanto
Moog, Inc.
Morgan Stanley
Motion Control Industries
Motor Coach Industries International
Motorola
Mrs. Allison's Cookie Co.
MTD Southwest
MTI Technology Corporation
Mulox
Munro & Company
My Room, Inc.
Nabco
Nabisco
NACCO Industries
National City Corporation
National Electric Carbon Products
National Life
National Semiconductor
National Textiles
NCR Corporation
neoIT
NETGEAR
Network Associates
Newbold Corporation
Newell Porcelain Co.
Newell Rubbermaid
Newell Window Furnishings
New World Pasta
New York Life Insurance
Nice Ball Bearings
****
Noble Construction Equipment
Nordstrom
Northrop Grumman
Northwest Airlines
Nu Gro Technologies
Nu-kote International
NutraMax Products
Nypro Alabama
O'Bryan Brothers Inc.
Ocwen Financial
Office Depot
Ogden Manufacturing
Oglevee, Ltd
Ohio Art
Ohmite Manufacturing Co.
Old Forge Lamp & Shade
The Oligear Company
Olympic West Sportswear
Omniglow Corporation
O'Neal Steel Inc.
ON Semiconductor
Oplink Communications, Inc.
Oracle
Orbitz
OshKosh B'Gosh
O'Sullivan Industries
Otis Elevator
Outsource Partners International
Owens-Brigam Medical Co.
Owens Corning
Owens-Illinois, Inc.
Oxford Automotive
Oxford Industries
Pacific Precision Metals
Pak-Mor Manufacturing
Palco Labs
palmOne
Paper Converting Machine Co.
Parallax Power Components
Paramount Apparel
Parker Hannifin
Parks & Wolson Machine Co.
Parsons E&C
Pass & Seymour Legrand
Paxar Corporation
Pearson Digital Learning
Peavey Electronics Corporation
Pendleton Woolen Mills
PeopleSoft
PepsiCo
Pericom Semiconductor
PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer Life Sciences, Inc.
Perot Systems
Pfaltzgraff
Pfizer
Phillips-Van Heusen
Photronics
Pinnacle Frames
Pinnacle West Capital Corporation
Pioneer Companies
Pitney Bowes
Plaid Clothing Company
Planar Systems
Plexus
Pliant Corporation
PL Industries
Polaroid
Polymer Sealing Solutions
Portal Software
Portex, Inc.
Portola Packaging
Port Townsend Paper Corp.
Power-One Inc.
Pradco
Pratt & Whitney
priceline.com
Price Pfister
Pridecraft Enterprises
Primanex Corporation
Prime Tanning
Primus Telecom
Procter & Gamble
Progress Lighting
ProQuest
Providian Financial
Prudential Insurance
Q.C. Onics Ventures
Quadion Corporation
Quaker Oats
Quantegy
Quark
Quickie Manufacturing Corp.
Qwest Communications
Radio Flyer
Radio Shack
Rainbow Technologies
Rawlings Sporting Goods
Rayovac
Raytheon Aircraft
RBX Industries
RCG Information Technology
Red Kap
Regal-Beloit Corporation
Regal Rugs
Regal Ware, Inc.
Regence Group
Renfro Corp.
Respiratory Support Products
Rexnord Industries
R.G. Barry Corp.
Richardson Brothers Co.
Rich Products
River Holding Corp.
Robert Manufacturing
Robert Mitchell Co.
Rochester Button Co.
Rockshox
Rockwell Automations
Rockwell Collins
Rogers
Rohm & Haas
Ropak Northwest
Roper Industries, Inc.
Royce Hosiery
RR Donnelley & Sons
Rugged Sportswear
Russell Corporation
S1 Corporation
S & B Engineers and Constructors
Sabre
Safeway
SAIC
Sallie Mae
Samsonite
Samuel-Whittar, Inc.
SanDisk Corporation
Sanford
Sanmina-SCI
Sapient
Sara Lee
Saturn Electronics & Engineering
Sauer-Danfoss
SBC Communications
Scantibodies Laboratory
Schott Scientific Glass
Schumacher Electric
Scientific Atlanta
The Scott Fetzer Company
Seal Glove Manufacturing
Seco Manufacturing Co.
SEI Investments
SEMCO (Southeastern Metals Manufacturing)
Sequa Corporation
Seton Company
Sheldahl Inc.
Shipping Systems, Inc.
S.H. Leggitt Co.
Shugart Corp.
Siebel Systems
Sierra Atlantic
Sights Denim Systems, Inc.
Signal Transformer
Signet Armorlite, Inc.
Sikorsky
Silicon Graphics
Silvered Electronic Mica Company
Simmons Juvenile Products
Simonds International
Simula Automotive Safety
SITEL
Skyworks Solutions
SMC Networks
SML Labels
Snap-on, Inc.
SNC Manufacturing Company
SoftBrands
Sola Optical USA
Solectron
Solon Manufacturing Co.
Sonoco Products Co.
Southwire Company
Sovereign Bancorp
Specialized Bicycle Components
Spectrum Control
Spicer Driveshaft Manufacturing
Spirit Silkscreens
Springs Industries
Springs Window Fashions
Sprint
Sprint PCS
SPX Corporation
Square D
SRAM Corporation
Takata Retraint Systems
Target
Teccor Electronics
Techalloy Company, Inc.
Technotrim
Tecumseh
Tee Jays Manufacturing
Telcordia
Telect
Teleflex
TeleTech
Telex Communications
Tellabs
Tenneco Automotive
Teradyne
Texaco Exploration and Production
Texas Instruments
Textron
Thermal Industries
Therm-O-Disc, Inc.
Thermo Electron
Thomas & Betts
Thomas Saginaw Ball Screw Co.
Thomasville Furniture
Three G's Manufacturing Co.
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans
Tiffany Industries
Time Warner
The Timken Company
Tingley Rubber Corp.
TMD Friction
Tomlinson Industries
The Toro Company
Torque-Traction Mfg. Tech.
Tower Automotive
Toys "R" Us
Trailmobile Trailer
Trans-Apparel Group
TransPro, Inc.
Trans Union
Travelocity
Trek Bicycle Corporation
Trend Technologies
TriMas Corp.
Trinity Industries
Triquint Semiconductor
TriVision Partners
Tropical Sportswear
Trumark Industries
TRW Automotive
Tumbleweed Communications
Tupperware
Tyco Electronics
Tyco International
Tyler Refrigeration
UCAR Carbon Company
Underwriters Laboratories
UniFirst Corporation
Union Pacific Railroad
Unison Industries
Unisys
United Airlines
UnitedHealth Group Inc.
United Online
United Plastics Group
United States Ceramic Tile
United Technologies
Universal Lighting Technologies
USAA
Valence Technology
Valeo Climate Control
Valeo Switches & Detection Systems
VA Software
Vaughan Furniture Co.
Velvac
Veritas
Verizon
Vertiflex Products
Vestshell Vermont, Inc.
VF Corporation
Viasystems
Vilter Manufacturing Corp.
Virginia Industries
Virginia KMP Corporation
Vishay Intertechnology
Vishay Vitramon
Visteon
VITAL Sourcing
Wabash Alloys, L.L.C.
Wabash Technologies
Wachovia Bank
Walgreens
Walls Industries
Warnaco
Washington Group International
Washington Mutual
Waterbury Companies
Waterloo Industries
Weavexx
Webb Furniture Enterprises
WebEx
Weiser Lock
WellChoice
Wellman Thermal Systems
Werner Co.
West Corporation
West Point Stevens
Wetherill AssociatesÊÊÊ
Weyco Group
Weyerhaeuser
Whirlpool
White Rodgers
Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Company
Winpak Films
Wolverine World Wide
Woodstock Wire Works
Woodstuff Manufacturing
WorldCom
World Kitchen
Worldtex
Wright Products
Wyeth
Wyman-Gordon Forgings
Xerox
Xpectra Incorporated
Xpitax
Yahoo!
Yarway Corporation
York International
Zenith
ZettaWorks Zimmerman Sign Company

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Old 16th September 2004, 00:18   #2
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That's one hell of a list.....
however.....

"they're not in the USA "
...
"yet don't even employ people here."

They still employ (some) Americans, its not like every single one of their employees is overseas......

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Old 16th September 2004, 00:29   #3
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If other people can do the same thing cheaper than you can, that means: (1) it's time for you to upgrade your skills and do something else that pays well; or (2) if you want to keep doing the same thing, you should match their price.

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Old 16th September 2004, 04:11   #4
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Well yeah if they can do it the same for cheaper or not as good for cheaper but Americans are covering for some of these companies follies and giving them benefits doesn't that mean these companies should look to Americans to employ? You can't just stick with a philosophy that can very well kill our country.

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Old 16th September 2004, 05:26   #5
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"if you want to keep doing the same thing, you should match their price"

Somewhere there is a guy living in a grass hut that will do the job for two loafs of bread a week. Take some taxpayer money, train them then give them the job. No matter what the job someone will do it in a third world country for nothing.

Eventually every job in our country can go the same way - many are. Sooner or later, we're living in gras huts and getting paid a loaf and a half of bread a week just to compete.

If you remember back in the 80's the big issues being rose because of companies that were sending their work to third world countries and paying people next to nothing? Issues were being rose about it then because it was considered depriving those people of a 'humane lifestyle'.

Eventually, those people might just be us.

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Old 16th September 2004, 06:02   #6
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Precisely the point of part (1) of my answer. If you can't stand earning low-end pay for a low-end job, upgrade your skills and move on.

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Old 16th September 2004, 16:21   #7
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Someone living in a grass hut would welcome the work and deserves to get it as long as they do a quality job.

That's the way a free market works. People buy and sell goods and labor for the going rate. If you think what you have deserves more, then hold out for a higher rate. But don't wait too long...

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Old 16th September 2004, 16:40   #8
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Maybe you should just get used to the inevitable fact that a global jobs market means wealth distribution. In this case it's travelling to the east and developing nations whilst it's still US owners that are making the profits. I'm all for these people being able to do a good job for a fair wage. That's what you get for high living expenses, demanding high wages and voting in governments that have demolished workers unions.

Do you believe that these people don't deserve these jobs and that these jobs are rightfully yours? Because you're very wrong if you do.

Sounds like sour grapes.

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Old 16th September 2004, 17:15   #9
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Still though we can swing both ways and have companies build manufacturing plants here. If foreign companies want to sell products in America they should build some in America.

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Old 16th September 2004, 17:30   #10
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why? That's being aniti competitive and stiffles a free market.

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Old 16th September 2004, 17:51   #11
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The problem with the whole 'worldwide' jobs market is it destroys the entire employment system we have in America.

Why do you think they have a 'minimum wage'?
Why do you think that in (most) jobs you have overtime pay for working over a certian amount of time?

In allowing these practices we lower our own standards of living, don't improve theirs much at all (since they have no minimum wage) and eventually no one is ahead except for the company owners. The few retain huge amounts of wealth, the many have little to nothing since we are all competitng for a few dollars a week instead of a decent standard of living.

Hey, we can even throw out the child labor laws since that's only there to protect them from being overworked and underpaid and in this global job market six year old kids can be planed on the factory floor and paid a quarter too, so we should allow our kids to be slaved as well since eventually such a system would have us all working for nothing and living in that grass hut.

Maybe that's a bit drastic but can you reasonably tell me how in time such a system would not eventually result in this being a reality?

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Old 16th September 2004, 18:21   #12
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Re: They take our tax money but don't give us jobs...

Quote:
Originally posted by MegaRock

Personally if you value your way of living, your job and your country you should not do business with these folks.

Adaptec
Adobe Systems
Amazon.com
AMD
AOL
Comcast Holdings
CompuServe
Earthlink
Google
Intel
Qwest Communications
Sallie Mae
SanDisk Corporation
Texas Instruments
Yahoo!
I just picked a few of these out of the list.
Anyone for giving up Google searches, or posting to this forum? After all, it is run by AOL. How about just giving up our computers completely that is, unless someone is up to giving AMD and Intel a run for their money.


Just as an FYI about minimum wage...

History of the Fair Labor Standards Act

# Congress enacted the FLSA in 1938 to guarantee employees of private employers certain minimum wages and time and one-half overtime standards.

# The FLSA was adopted as a means of economic recovery from the Great Depression. The FLSA sought to ensure a maximum number of jobs, which paid a minimum livable wage. By requiring overtime pay, the FLSA created a monetary penalty for employers who did not spread their existing work among a greater number of employees.

# Coverage of the Act was extended to state and local governments in 1985.

# Nationally, over 90 million employees are covered by this Act.

# Although amended, the Act essentially remains the New Deal legislation, born out of the Depression. Many of the requirements of the statute are premised upon increasing employment by penalizing overtime.

http://www.dol.gov/esa/minwage/america.htm
http://www.fedminwage.com/
http://www.dol.gov/asp/programs/history/flsa1938.htm


Last edited by WomanOfHeart; 16th September 2004 at 18:41.
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Old 16th September 2004, 18:41   #13
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blah, two words, global economy. This type of thing was inevitable and has been happening steadily over the past 2 decades. Get used to it, let the free market determine it's course quit trying to stop what is unstopable and should be not stopped. Because believe it or not as those jobs move east we here in the US get better jobs, how many steal mills exist as compared to 30 years ago? would you take that steal mill job if you had the opportunity to do better with your life by becoming employed under a service based economy? I for one think that what is happening is a great thing for our economy and the economy of other markets around the world. It allows us to specialize in things we are good at while getting the benefit of other specialized countries goods and services and increasing overall quality for all the products and services you use.
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Old 16th September 2004, 19:31   #14
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This is what forced me out of the steel industry after 16 years and back to school. That was 10 years ago. This is not new, its been coming for a long time.

Students: More reason to excel in school before you have to peddle yourself to prospective employers.

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Old 16th September 2004, 19:56   #15
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"It allows us to specialize in things we are good at while getting the benefit of other specialized countries goods and services and increasing overall quality for all the products and services you use."

But in reality what do we specialize in anymore? Manufacturing jobs are all but gone. General labor jobs are being filled by H1-B visa holders. Medical seems overwhelmed by Easterners. Most material goods like cars, electronics, clothing and such are all operated from third world countries where employees come dirt cheap. We're even being beaten out on many forms of farming. About the only thing we have that is somewhat big is the entertainment industry and even that's not totally true anymore.

Seriously, what industry do we have left that isn't succeptable to being wholesaled out to the lowest bidder? See, this isn't spreading the wealth - it's spreading poverty to the world.

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Old 17th September 2004, 00:38   #16
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We specialize in ownership
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Old 18th September 2004, 04:01   #17
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This is exactly why I'm back in school. I lost my job to outsourcing when Hitachi decided $16 an hour was too much to pay for a technician. The person doing my job now gets paid $.50 an hour in China.

I'm going back to school now moving away from the tech industry.
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Old 18th September 2004, 07:10   #18
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What industry do you plan on entering?

I'm Back?
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Old 20th September 2004, 00:00   #19
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Originally posted by whiteflip
What industry do you plan on entering?
Medical, *******eutical, or EMT. Gaurenteed to stay in the US.
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Old 20th September 2004, 04:31   #20
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...It should be illegal to ship jobs over seas.
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Old 20th September 2004, 07:11   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by squakMix
...It should be illegal to ship jobs over seas.
By logical extension, it should also be illegal to buy any stuff, including manpower, from overseas, because any money going outside is money not earned by Americans.

To prevent anyone from buying stuff overseas, overseas travel should be banned, mails delivery and telephone connections will be confined within the US, and outgoing Internet links should be severed.

Either you're buying from the US, or you're buying from the terrorists.

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Old 20th September 2004, 10:10   #22
Jay
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Originally posted by squakMix
...It should be illegal to ship jobs over seas.
it should also be illegal for overseas companies to establish businesses here and create jobs for americans. Who wants to work for terrorists anyways?
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Old 21st September 2004, 15:50   #23
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Medical seems overwhelmed by Easterners.
Kinda depends on the region you are in. I, for one, am not too worried about the medical field. In fact it's the biggest career field that desperately needs qualified workers (not just doctors). As Starbucks has found out, medical employees in certain sections are in high demand and are paid great money.

Most hospitals here in the US are short of nurses, so what do they do? They import nurses from overseas (usually the Philippines)! There's a huge debate going on now, trying to get hospitals to provide a better incentive for nurses and for colleges to ease financial grants for prospective students in nursing.

On a last rambling note, I'd rather see international students come here, become doctors, and be able to go back to their home country and try to improve the lives there.
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Old 22nd September 2004, 20:49   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by griffinn
By logical extension, it should also be illegal to buy any stuff, including manpower, from overseas, because any money going outside is money not earned by Americans.

To prevent anyone from buying stuff overseas, overseas travel should be banned, mails delivery and telephone connections will be confined within the US, and outgoing Internet links should be severed.

Either you're buying from the US, or you're buying from the terrorists.

YAHOOOOOO!!!!


Although I may be flippant a lot of the time, in reality I'm flabagasted at the state of world trade and how much it sucks. Not for us westerners, Americans and Europeans but for the poorest of the world. We really need to remind ourselves just how well off we are because I think people complaining in this thread need a reality check.


Quote:
http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Facts.asp
# Half the world -- nearly three billion people -- live on less than two dollars a day. 1
# The GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the poorest 48 nations (i.e. a quarter of the world's countries) is less than the wealth of the world's three richest people combined. 2
# Nearly a billion people entered the 21st century unable to read a book or sign their names. 3
# Less than one per cent of what the world spent every year on weapons was needed to put every child into school by the year 2000 and yet it didn't happen. 4
# 51 percent of the world's 100 hundred wealthiest bodies are corporations. 5
# The wealthiest nation on Earth has the widest gap between rich and poor of any industrialized nation. 6
# The poorer the country, the more likely it is that debt repayments are being extracted directly from people who neither contracted the loans nor received any of the money. 7
# 20% of the population in the developed nations, consume 86% of the worlds goods. 8
# The top fifth of the world's people in the richest countries enjoy 82% of the expanding export trade and 68% of foreign direct investment -- the bottom fifth, barely more than 1%. 9
# In 1960, the 20% of the world's people in the richest countries had 30 times the income of the poorest 20% -- in 1997, 74 times as much. 10
# An analysis of long-term trends shows the distance between the richest and poorest countries was about:

* 3 to 1 in 1820
* 11 to 1 in 1913
* 35 to 1 in 1950
* 44 to 1 in 1973
* 72 to 1 in 1992 11

# “The lives of 1.7 million children will be needlessly lost this year [2000] because world governments have failed to reduce poverty levels”12
# The developing world now spends $13 on debt repayment for every $1 it receives in grants. 13
# A few hundred millionaires now own as much wealth as the world's poorest 2.5 billion people. 14
# “The 48 poorest countries account for less than 0.4 per cent of global exports.”15
# “The combined wealth of the world's 200 richest people hit $1 trillion in 1999; the combined incomes of the 582 million people living in the 43 least developed countries is $146 billion.”16
# “Of all human rights failures today, those in economic and social areas affect by far the larger number and are the most widespread across the world's nations and large numbers of people.”17
# “Approximately 790 million people in the developing world are still chronically undernourished, almost two-thirds of whom reside in Asia and the Pacific.”18
# “7 Million children die each year as a result of the debt crisis. 8525038 children have died since the start of the year 2000 [as of March 24, 2001].”19
# For economic growth and almost all of the other indicators, the last 20 years [of the current form of globalization, from 1980 - 2000] have shown a very clear decline in progress as compared with the previous two decades [1960 - 1980]. For each indicator, countries were divided into five roughly equal groups, according to what level the countries had achieved by the start of the period (1960 or 1980). Among the findings:

* Growth: The fall in economic growth rates was most pronounced and across the board for all groups or countries.
* Life Expectancy: Progress in life expectancy was also reduced for 4 out of the 5 groups of countries, with the exception of the highest group (life expectancy 69-76 years).
* Infant and Child Mortality: Progress in reducing infant mortality was also considerably slower during the period of globalization (1980-1998) than over the previous two decades.
* Education and literacy: Progress in education also slowed during the period of globalization. 20

# “Today, across the world, 1.3 billion people live on less than one dollar a day; 3 billion live on under two dollars a day; 1.3 billion have no access to clean water; 3 billion have no access to sanitation; 2 billion have no access to electricity.”21
# The richest 50 million people in Europe and North America have the same income as 2.7 billion poor people. “The slice of the cake taken by 1% is the same size as that handed to the poorest 57%.”22
# The world's 497 billionaires in 2001 registered a combined wealth of $1.54 trillion, well over the combined gross national products of all the nations of sub-Saharan Africa ($929.3 billion) or those of the oil-rich regions of the Middle East and North Africa ($1.34 trillion). It is also greater than the combined incomes of the poorest half of humanity. 23
# A mere 12 percent of the world's population uses 85 percent of its water, and these 12 percent do not live in the Third World. 24
#
Consider the global priorities in spending in 1998 Global Priority $U.S. Billions
Basic education for everyone in the world 6
Cosmetics in the United States 8
Water and sanitation for everyone in the world 9
Ice cream in Europe 11
Reproductive health for all women in the world 12
Perfumes in Europe and the United States 12
Basic health and nutrition for everyone in the world 13
Pet foods in Europe and the United States 17
Business entertainment in Japan 35
Cigarettes in Europe 50
Alcoholic drinks in Europe 105
Narcotics drugs in the world 400
Military spending in the world 780

Quote:
http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/FreeTrade/Neoliberalism.asp
The underlying assumption then is that the free markets are a good thing. They may well be, but unfortunately, reality seems different from theory. For many economists who believe in it strongly the ideology almost takes on the form of a theology. However, less discussed is the the issue of power and how that can seriously affect, influence and manipulate trade for certain interests. One would then need to ask if free trade is really possible.

From a power perspective, “free” trade in reality is seen by many around the world as a continuation of those old policies of plunder, whether it is intended to be or not. However, we don't usually hear such discussions in the mainstream media, even though thousands have protested around the world for decades.

Today then, neoliberal policies are seeing positives and negatives. Under free enterprise, there have been many innovative products. Growth and development for some have been immense. Unfortunately, for most people in the world there has been an increase in poverty and the innovation and growth has not been designed to meet immediate needs for many of the world's people. Global inequalities on various indicators are sharp. For example,

* Some 3 billion people -- or half of humanity -- live on under 2 dollars a day
* 86 percent of the world's resources are consumed by the world's wealthiest 20 percent
Quote:
http://www.oneworld.net/article/view/77129/1/
The path of economic globalization must be changed to avoid undermining social security. Otherwise it will continue to exacerbate poverty, and therefore violence, warned World Social Forum panellists here Monday, including Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate in Economics.

"The essence of economic globalization is that it should bring job security. If there were such a commitment, developing countries could have opened markets by explicitly tying market access to job opportunities," said the U.S. expert who served as the World Bank's chief economist from 1997 to 2000.

Economic instability and social insecurity will lead to a rise in violence in the world because it is impossible to separate economic issues from social and political issues, he said.

The loudest applause went to Stiglitz at Monday's conference, "Globalization, Economic and Social security," which drew more than 1,000 of the reportedly more than 150,000 people participating in the Mumbai World Social Forum (WSF).

To protect the workers' social benefits, "economic policy cannot be delegated to the technocrats of international financial institutions," but instead should be at the centre of democratic debate in each country, he said.

Stiglitz, professor at Columbia University in New York, condemned the insistent pressure that the International Monetary Fund exerts on countries of the developing South to reform their social security systems, reforms he says ends up eroding the few protections that millions of workers might have.

"We think science is interesting and if you disagree, you can fuck off."
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