Old 1st March 2005, 23:51   #1
k_rock923
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Issac Asimov

I know some people here are fans of this author and I'd like their advice. For someone who has never read anything by him can you kind of explain what is going on? There seem to be so many different series, the robot chronicles, which i though would be all of his robot books turned out to be something different. Where should I start with him and how should I proceed after that. I'm a bit confused on this.

edit//oh yea, does anybody know where I can get a copy of I, Robot without will smith on the cover?

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Old 2nd March 2005, 00:02   #2
Phyltre
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1. No.
2. Start with book 1 and move from there.
3. I suggest eBay.

(Sorry, I read the...erm...series that spans like a few thousand years and includes predicting the cuture mathematically? but I don't know much about Asimov...)
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Old 2nd March 2005, 00:12   #3
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Personally, I've always liked his short stories better than his novels. (The Robots collection especially).

3.)Might I suggest your local library?

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Old 2nd March 2005, 00:18   #4
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So wait. His robot things are short stories and not novels?

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Old 2nd March 2005, 00:47   #5
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I liked the Foundation series a few years back.

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Old 2nd March 2005, 02:19   #6
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I, Robot was a collection of short stories. The movie is a take on one of the stories which incorporates elements from other stories within the book.


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Old 2nd March 2005, 05:35   #7
Hollow
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Gah. Sorry about that. I swore I read a collection of his call just "Robots" apparently I remembered that incorrectly.

He's got a bunch of short stories that feature robots, as well as some novels. The Robots of Dawn is one of the novels.

Try looking here, it should explain just about anything you're looking to find out. http://www.asimovonline.com/

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Old 2nd March 2005, 05:46   #8
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The Foundation Series, beleive it or not is tied to his Robot series. There is a series of novels that involve a human detective from Earth assigned to invistigate a puzzling accident that turns out to be a homocide.

He is brought from Earth to this Colony of Earth, because the police force of this very thinly populated planet has no experience in investingating this kind of - thing. I forget the decective's name, but being from Earth, he hates robots - just like Will Smith's character. But unlike the movie - which has absolutely nothing in common with the works of Azimov, except the title of one of his books - robots are not ever - EVER - violent to humans in anyway.

That makes this "accident" very strange. So, the police agency on this colony calls for help from Earth. I'll call the detective "Hal", cause I can't recall his name. So, Detective Hal, arrives and they assign him a partner from their police agency. Hal is cool with his partner Daneel Oliva, until he figures out that Daneel Oliva is a very advanced ROBOT designed to look and act human.

Daneel is not completely convincing as a human, (real people can figure out he's a robot in nothing flat) but that makes his character very real and convincing. Over time Hal develops professional respect and friendship with Daneel Oliva as they solve a series of crimes together. Azimov writes three books in this series.

The Foundation series and the Robot series may not seem like it, but they are connected, and the Foundation series does throw in references back to the robot series, here and there, that makes reading the Robot series relevent.

The Foundation series starts several hundreds of years in the future of the robot series. If you have not read them before, I recommend you read the robot series first, then the Foundation series. That way you'll be totally BLOWN AWAY by the ending of the last of the Foundation series.
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Old 2nd March 2005, 06:00   #9
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Elijah Baley! That was the detective's name, Elijah Baley.

And here are the Robot novels:

* The Caves of Steel
* The Naked Sun
* The Robots of Dawn
* Robots and Empire

By the way, his short stories all take place in the same world of his Robot and Foundation novels (I think).

Short Story Collections:

* I, Robot
* The Rest of the Robots
* The Complete Robot (a single collection of most of Asimov's pre-1982 robot stories)
* Robot Dreams
* Robot Visions
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Old 2nd March 2005, 19:14   #10
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Thank you very much. That was quite helpful

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Old 3rd March 2005, 01:48   #11
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great author only got to read his foundation series as well as a couple of his non-fiction works. its just a shame how he died of aids
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Old 3rd March 2005, 02:34   #12
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In late March, 2002, Prometheus Books published It's Been a Good Life, an autobiography edited by Janet Jeppson Asimov. The new book was compiled from selections made from the three previous autobiographical volumes In Memory Yet Green (1979), In Joy Still Felt (1980), and I. Asimov: A Memoir (1994). The book also features "A Way of Thinking", Asimov's 400th essay for the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, which Janet put together from conversations they had and letters they had exchanged during many years of correspondence. In addition, there are excerpts from those letters sprinkled throughout the book. The result is a portrait of the life of Isaac Asimov, the writer, humanist, thinker, wit, and bon vivant, which lovingly illustrates why he was able to truthfully say "It's been a good life".

The book also includes an epilogue in which Janet Jeppson Asimov reveals for the first time that Isaac's 1992 death from heart and kidney failure was a consequence of AIDS contracted from a transfusion of tainted blood during his December 1983 triple-bypass operation. She explains how and when he learned he had the disease, and why his doctors convinced him to keep it a secret from the public. The epilogue includes a description of Asimov's final days, together with some poignant passages that describe his views of life and death.

[There have been some erroneous published reports stating that it was Janet Asimov who convinced her husband to keep the fact that he had contracted AIDS a secret. This is absolutely untrue. In fact it was Asimov's doctors who urged that the matter be kept a secret. See Janet's April 4, 2002 letter to Locus magazine.]

The book can be purchased online from amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.
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