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Old 16th September 2012, 05:51   #1
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Advice: need new typist's keyboard, old one died at 11 years old!

Kinda hard to type a decent post when the title mostly says it all.



I've been very good about getting amazing cutting-edge technology for my computer tower and monitors, but the funny thing is, I've been pretty happy with my relatively simple keyboard and mouse.

Up until about 2 hours ago, I've been using a Dell-branded keyboard which came with the purchase of a full compute back in 2001. I bought the system to help with my first teaching job. This old keyboard, believe it or not, is a true mechanical keyboard, meaning it has true metal springs and clicks, not rubber domes and taps. It is a typists' keyboard; with the same type of architecture of the old IBM model M, except with the added functionality of common extra keys and the ability to recognize many simultaneous key-pushes, which can be common during gaming.

That said, I am not a hardcore gamer, but I do need a keyboard that can recognize many keys being depressed at the same time, because I do game occasionally (about 2 hours each Sunday afternoon), and when I do, I tend to be very successful, and I don't want to hurt my screen name's reputation, as shallow as that sounds.

I am looking for something similar - a metal-spring keyboard good for hardcore typing, with the added functionality of multiple simultaneous pushes. I'm looking for something that continues to work well with my gell-based fabric-skinned wrist pad. It has a straight edge, meaning keyboards with a curved or bumped front won't work for me.

No, I don't want the optimus maximus keyboard. I tried one of those during a TIE conference, and it absolutely sucks for typing. Tactile feedback sucks, keys are too big, and space between keytop surfaces is too small. It's a novelty at best. I need something that gets shit done, not necessarily something to impress geeks with. If the OM kybd had the shape and feel of a regular mechanical kybd, I honestly would not mind dropping the $1500 on it, but again, it sucks for productive work.

I need something that has very well-defined bumps to indicate the f, j, and number pad 5 keys so that I can find where my fingers need to be so that I can get straight to work. I would like the best possible tactile feedback, similar or equal to what I'm used to with the mechanical springs in the one that just died.

Backlit letters/numbers would add a bit of appeal, but I wouldn't cry if I didn't get them; same goes with non-103 keys, meaning those extra programmable keys that aren't part of a standard keyboard. I don't really need extra USB ports or card readers. My tower is handy and has a lot of those.

I do need a number pad and I do need key location to be standard, meaning I don't want anything to be located in odd places. An annoyance of mine is the gross bastardization of key locations on laptops. I really don't want this happening on a desktop keyboard. In other words, I would like to reach for the delete key and hit the delete key, not something else that was mistakenly placed where the delete key belongs.

There are a decent amount of models that fit these parameters. I'm asking advice from anyone who has some input on which of these to choose.

I can no longer use the old kybd because it finally died. Each keystroke produces very random simultaneous characters, e.g. when I try to press g, I get b, g, t, 5, and F4 all at the same time with one keystroke. This happened after a liquid spill. More details on that later if anyone is curious.

PS/2 or USB, both acceptable, since I have spare ports for both on the motherboard.

Bottom line, I just really need a very high quality typist's keyboard that can occasionally be used for gaming. This last one made it 11 years. I would very much like if the replacement could do as well or better.

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Old 16th September 2012, 15:24   #2
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Actually semi-serious: get a model M! Clicky Keyboards sells the actual, used ones. Unicomp currently owns the rights to the design.

I use a Microsoft 4000 both at home and work and love them. Haven't had to replace one yet, but I've only been using them for 3 years or so.

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Old 16th September 2012, 19:08   #3
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I think Microsoft makes the best keyboard and mice.... bang for buck...

http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Wire...mouse+keyboard

This bundle is ok. I'm kinda ham handed. Nothing has ever lasted me 11 years.
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Old 16th September 2012, 19:24   #4
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Once you try mechanical for about 10 minutes, you'll always, for the rest of your life, feel that rubber-dome just doesn't cut it. If I hadn't been spoiled by mechanical, that basic Microsoft keyboard would be perfect, but sadly I've been spoiled.

I'm currently typing on a wireless Logitech that I bought for when I'm on the couch using the PC as a home theater. It's rubber-dome and just doesn't feel right at all. I'm making mistakes and having to correct, I'm typing slower, and my fingers get tired faster due to no attention paid to weighting the keys. The keys don't seem to lift my fingers back up the way the spring-loaded ones on the old one did, so I'm working harder to lift my fingers than I am to press the keys down.

Damn I'm getting really picky... I hope I don't turn overly OCD as I age.

One thing I did like about the Microsoft keyboard you posted: They advertise a design that channels liquid spillage away. That would have helped last night.

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Old 16th September 2012, 20:09   #5
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http://pckeyboard.com/page/category/ClassicTrackball

This one looks promising (thanks to KR for pointing out the brand).

The good:

*The added trackball could be helpful for precision pointing or fast mouse movements when necessary.

*buckling springs give it the mechanical feel I'm looking for

*straight-line front will likely allow me to continue to use my gel/fabric wrist rest which I have come to love

*available in black to match my other stuff

*made in the USA (!)

The bad:

*I may or may not like the look of the gray keys, although I might be able to custom order black using their customization web site. I'm torn because the gray-on-black might actually be a good thing for faster hand placement, although I normally don't look when I put my hands on a keyboard.

*it looks really big. I don't have a lot of space, meaning I may have to order without the trackball or if still too big, order a different brand.

*they didn't specify how many simultaneous keys that this keyboard recognizes.

*cant tell what is done to denote f, j, and numpad 5 keys for hand placement.

I emailed the company and asked questions on dimensions of the trackball and non-trackball models, and also asked about the simultaneous key issue, forgot to ask about the key-bumps. edit - sent another message asking about that and the return policy

Any thoughts on it?

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Last edited by swingdjted; 16th September 2012 at 21:09.
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Old 18th September 2012, 01:18   #6
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Yeah.... >$100 for a keyboard is not in my budget. I understand the advantage. The keys are nice and positive. I like trackballs, but I don't think I'd want one on the keyboard.
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Old 18th September 2012, 03:36   #7
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I'm hoping this thing will last 10+ years, so hopefully that'll at least somewhat justify the cost, but I can understand, that is quite a very high price for a keyboard.

The trackball would be a secondary mouse, to be used mostly only when I need something faster or more precise than the usual mouse, like a supplemental tool rather than a primary necessity. I'd still use the regular mouse for most of my pointing. If the dimensions turn out to be too big, I'll have to forget the trackball and save some money.

Aside of price, noise, and size, can anyone see a reason not to go with a Unicomp?

Am I missing other good mechanical keyboards?

Too many questions?

Coca-Cola or Pepsi?

Bueller?

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Old 18th September 2012, 06:51   #8
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You might be right. I type a lot. Maybe it would be good to use something pro grade. That trackball looks about as useless as tits on a bowling ball.

http://www.amazon.com/Das-Keyboard-M...ional+keyboard

?
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Old 18th September 2012, 07:55   #9
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What you posted (Das Keyboard):

Good:

Probably noticeably quieter than unicomp, but still with a good mechanical feel (Cherry MX Brown isn't clicky, which would be good if you don't want an automatic rifle firing every time you type).

I've heard good things from people who have tried "Das Keyboard" products although I've never typed on one before. A lot of people prefer the one with no characters written on the keys, but the one you point out is the opposite extreme where the characters are laser inscribed, never to come off. That way there's a model for both tastes.

Amazon claims "Darth Vader approved" meaning if I ever have Darth Vader over for a game of Bocce, he can go inside and check his email if he wants and still be happy.

Here's a decent explanation of the type of action it has.

Bad:

Priced even higher than Unicomp. Unicomp without trackball is $79, Das Keyboard (without trackball of course) is $129. Honestly though, I still consider those prices close enough to say that I would choose the best feel keyboard between the two, not necessarily the best priced keyboard. I just wish I had a way to compare in real-life typing. Buy both, keep best and return other one? They both look pretty good.

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Old 18th September 2012, 15:49   #10
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Seriously, I have always been a fan of the apple extended keyboards. Even on PCs. For what ever reason, I can simply type faster on those than an any other keyboard. I think it might be because you have to push the key so little in order for it to resister... it literally allows for your fingers to glide over the keys. With the well defined ridge at the bottom, I've never had a problem finding the f,j, or 5 key.
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Old 18th September 2012, 20:44   #11
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I bought a new one last week. The old one lasted around 7 years. The new one cost me just €2.79. It works. Even if it'd only last a year, I still think it's a pretty good keyboard for what it cost me. linky to image (lower one but with a USB connector)

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Old 18th September 2012, 23:23   #12
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I had a pretty nice mac set ("magic" mouse and keyboard) when I worked in Iowa. Very good styling, and interesting impressive functions on the mouse, but I couldn't get used to the flat keys and shallow action among other complaints about the ergonomics of the mouse. The keyboard felt ok for short bursts of typing - very fast and light as you say, good for things like web browsing, short emails, database and spreadsheet work, etc., but if I had to type a couple dozen letters of recommendation and admission questionnaires for college entry for my seniors (which was common for many nearly-sleepless nights) those shallow keys felt like I was pecking at a slab of concrete. Then eventually I'd just take the work home for the better ergonomic setup.

That's not to say they're no good for everyone, but I like the concaved surfaces, longer travel, increased resistance, and stronger lift after each keystroke. It's hard to explain, but I'll try: Your fingers don't really bounce in a V pattern of speed/acceleration/deceleration but rather a smooth U pattern, despite the helpful sound feedback that sounds like more impact. Bungee jumping rather than a ping-pong ball bounce (or table-tennis ball bounce, if you're, well, you know).

I ended up leaving that mac set at my last job when I moved, even though I had bought it. I probably should have kept it; may have been able to sell or loan it out to someone that doesn't type quite as much and loves the styling, but hopefully it's making someone else happy.

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Old 7th October 2012, 05:39   #13
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Well, here it is. The first thing I noticed is that it feels heavy enough to win a fight against someone with it if I wanted to. It types like a dream. I really love the action of the keys. This feels a bit different from the old Dell, because I don't know if the Dell's metal springs actually "buckled". This Unicomp has even more resistance than the Dell, which was already a lot more than the usual rubber-dome model. I won't need an adjustment period; it already felt good for typing the minute I plugged it in. You'd think the extra resistance would tire someone more, but it seems easier to type if you ask me.

The youtubes and other sound clips out there are pretty accurate with the sound. It puts out a significant amount of sound and is full of 'clack' sounds, whereas the Dell had slightly lighter 'clicks' and normal rubber-dome keyboards have a quiet 'tap'. This isn't necessarily "loud", but enough that you need to consider your own preferences and the tolerance of the people in the same and next rooms. Luckily my wife and baby don't mind it at all. It even seems to help put the baby to sleep.

I've had it for maybe 3-4 days now and have only typed a few lesson plans, case notes, winamp posts, and picture/video tags (plus some browsing). That, to me, isn't much typing yet, but a real test will come this week when I undergo some major projects at work.

The first few times I started up the computer, it didn't respond at all to the keyboard until after I logged in with the wireless Logitech. I had to unplug and replug the Unicomp before it would be recognized after each time I logged on. For some reason, starting last night, this stopped being an issue, and I can now just log on with the Unicomp. Driver issue? Not sure.



Quote:
Originally Posted by rockouthippie View Post
That trackball looks about as useless as tits on a bowling ball.
Well, shit. You're right, but not because of the location of it. This trackball is pretty useless because it's not very precise. I'd need a video to really demonstrate what I mean, but perhaps this comparison between MS Paint images will help. The lines on the left were made by drawing freehand diagonally with a common everyday optical mouse (using the pencil tool). The lines on the right were made the same way with the trackball on this keyboard:



So, this must also be very old technology, but in this case, the old technology isn't such a good thing. I'm thinking about asking the company if I can exchange it for the model with the red spot mouse between the g and h keys but will first ask if it's any more precise. If not, I'll ask if I can just exchange for the model without any kind of pointer, and get some of the money back for the difference in price.

Anyway, there are a couple ways you can click with this thing. There are a set of bigger buttons on top and on the back, each of which are meant as left and right click. Use back set if you like to move the ball with your thumb or top set if you like to use your fingers. The smaller buttons on the top and back are mystery buttons. I have no idea what they do. I'm just hoping that by testing them I didn't accidentally fire nukes to some other country.


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Old 7th October 2012, 08:32   #14
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Quote:
model with the red spot mouse between the g and h keys
I had a thinkpad with one of those dots in the keyboard. It was useful. It kinda sounds to me like you don't have the right driver for the keyboard given the inactive buttons. Given the classic nature of the keyboard, does the right driver exist?

I can't draw anything resembling a straight line with a trackball anyway. Luckily, I have a Wacom tablet. You aren't gonna be drawing any lines with the red dot mouse either.

If you can navigate Windows with the thing, I think I'd call it a win.
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Old 7th October 2012, 14:06   #15
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The Etch A Sketch of input devices.

I'd just go for one without an added mouse type device attached. Then you won't have something, that is basically already redundant, taking up any room.

Also those keys are like mountains and the American keyboard layout is oddly different.
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Old 7th October 2012, 14:17   #16
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If you can use the trackball to highlight text and drag windows around, I'd let sleeping dogs lie and stick with what you've now got. The handiness of the trackball (i.e. not necessarily needing to have a mouse at all unless you're drawing) may grow on you.

Quote:
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the American keyboard layout is oddly different.
Is it?

Right then, we're definitely bringing our own netbook with us when we visit the Old Dart next month. Learning a new keyboard layout is something I can do without.

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Old 7th October 2012, 15:11   #17
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You should be okay actually.
Wikipedia tells me that Oz uses the US layout.

UK:


US:
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Old 8th October 2012, 01:47   #18
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"@" not being at Shift+2 would do my head in. The rest is not too bad.

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Old 8th October 2012, 22:57   #19
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The curve you see to the right of the keys shows an ergonomic feature which allows a user to move his/her fingers less when moving above or below the home row, and it helps address the resulting change in angle of finger depression. This is something that I've found to make typing feel a bit faster and more natural. I had to edit the photo a lot to make it able to be seen though - lots of brightness and contrast work.


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Old 9th October 2012, 06:02   #20
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Quote:
"@" not being at Shift+2 would do my head in. The rest is not too bad.
for being a commie plot.... Pretty soon you'll start laughing at British humor, drinking tea, and driving on the wrong side of the road.

Last edited by rockouthippie; 9th October 2012 at 07:04.
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Old 9th October 2012, 13:40   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockouthippie View Post
for being a commie plot.... Pretty soon you'll start laughing at British humor, drinking tea, and driving on the wrong side of the road.
Apart from the tea drinking, I'm already guilty on the other two counts -- seeing how I'm Australian and all...

Quote:
Originally Posted by swingdjted View Post
The curve you see to the right of the keys shows an ergonomic feature which allows a user to move his/her fingers less when moving above or below the home row, and it helps address the resulting change in angle of finger depression. This is something that I've found to make typing feel a bit faster and more natural.
I'm glad I was never spoilt by starting out with such quality keyboards.

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Old 9th October 2012, 13:51   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iomegajaz View Post
I'm glad I was never spoilt by starting out with such quality keyboards.
I don't think I've ever had such a keyboard. Now I'm very interested.
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Old 10th October 2012, 02:46   #23
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I'm probably making far to big of a deal out of this, but those little things help in their own little ways, especially if you're going to do a lot of typing in one sitting. The only problem is the fact that eventually, you have to go back to regular keyboards when not using your own, and being spoiled (or spoilt) does kinda ruin your perception of all the others. For example, this keyboard causes me to dislike long-term typing on laptop keyboards, whereas if I had never tried this, I probably wouldn't notice, thinking that it's just normal and acceptable to get tired of typing after so long. Looking back, I think I may have actually learned to type on the old IBM model M keyboards; perhaps that's why this seems so normal to me (this keyboard is exactly-identical other than the addition of the 3 windows keys and trackball added). Most people who get these never change from them. They last pretty much forever due to their "industrial" mechanical design, and they're made for on-the-job long-term typing for people that type all day every day.

With today's computer specs, pretty much anything on today's market is going to be overkill in terms of what's in the tower, making it more noticeable when you compare items outside of the tower, such as monitors, mice, and keyboards. Having a quality version of these things makes a much bigger difference on your overall experience than one would guess.

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Old 11th October 2012, 01:43   #24
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I can attest to the value of a quality keyboard. I got used to the Microsoft 4000 and am so used to it that I can't really type on anything else. I would love something with more tactile feedback.

I also invested in a high quality mouse, as I've been doing a lot more clicking than typing ever since making the Linux admin->Windows admin jump a few years ago.

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Old 29th October 2012, 16:59   #25
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I've tested my speed on a regular rubber-dome keyboard vs. this one (I just used http://play.typeracer.com/), and I can confirm that this keyboard doesn't change my average speed. I average in the low 80's with both this Unicomp and the Logitech wireless rubber-dome keyboard. I still think that this Unicomp feels a lot better on my hands and wrists after a long session of continual typing and still think it was a worthy investment. Hopefully it'll be the last keyboard I buy for a long time.

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Old 29th October 2012, 21:06   #26
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I'm using about a year old Logitech (about $30). It's getting due for replacement. It's getting pretty crunchy. I didn't think about it, but in the long run, it's probably not economical to buy these cheapo keyboards.
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Old 29th October 2012, 22:28   #27
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The model M keyboards have been around since the '80s and virtually no one has ever let one go because it went bad on them. This Unicomp is the same thing; hopefully it'll last just the same way.

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Old 5th November 2012, 21:19   #28
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Definitely a fan of mechanical keyboards. I've been using the Happy Hacking Professional 2 for a few years now and it does live up to the reputation of having the best typing experience. The only downside is some of the modifier keys have nonstandard placements, along with the arrow keys. I also use a Leopold, they make good boards at a lower price point. I have a Das as well, the blank one, which was great for killing my look-down habit. I do find myself mentally counting out the F keys when I need them.

But for whatever reason I can never get the upper number and sign keys down perfectly. Tenkeys are easy but I guess my keyboards are just different enough that they never mentally click for me. It's really only a problem during gaming or some other activity where you just need to press the one key outside of typing words.
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Old 7th November 2012, 18:19   #29
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might be considered spam but I thought it was fitting here.

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Old 7th November 2012, 23:54   #30
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Heh, I love it. I actually have access to an old manual typewriter, but I have no idea where to find ribbon for it. I would like it if I could convert it to a computer keyboard. That would be pretty impressive, but mostly a novelty and not a daily typer.

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Old 8th November 2012, 06:04   #31
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Hi swingdjted,

Did you ever try cleaning your old Dell plank? Running a lot of hot water through it, then letting it set at an angle for several days to completely dry out.

Some have been able to rescue their sturdy older keyboards from liquid spills by giving them a brief run in a dishwasher.


Hi Warrior of the Light,

Loved the video. I remember using mechanicals back in the 50's and trying to jam the keys by typing non-sense stuff real fast. Then the selectrics came out and killed all the fun.

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Old 8th November 2012, 19:42   #32
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Quote:
Some have been able to rescue their sturdy older keyboards from liquid spills by giving them a brief run in a dishwasher.
I usually run them for a heavy duty cycle with no heat drying and no soap (dishwasher soap is corrosive) .... then let them sit and dry out at least a week. Don't plug it in wet. Is that sort of like the warning on soup "Contents will be hot"?

I've done this a dozen times. It never hurt anything. It worked most of the time... It isn't just sturdy older keyboards. It works with the cheap ones too.
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Old 9th November 2012, 19:16   #33
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Honestly I've heard great things about this. I've never tried it myself, but I know keyboard enthusiasts who would give up an arm as a voucher for these things. At the same time, they are pretty pricey. But they also offer blank keyboards in case you ever wanted to switch from QWERTY to COLEMAK or something.

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Old 10th November 2012, 00:14   #34
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The liquid, believe it or not, was hot pasta sauce. I was busy getting some stuff done for work, so I brought dinner to the computer workstation, and brought the pasta separate from the sauce. When I came with the sauce, I accidentally grabbed the pot in a hot spot, and when changing hand positions to keep from getting burned and keeping from a complete spill, a good amount of it splashed on the keyboard while the computer was on. I tried wet-vacuuming it first without and then with the brush attachment, which didn't fix it, so I tried unplugging it and spraying it with the kitchen sink spray hose. That made the keyboard look very clean and almost new. I let it dry, standing it up near a box fan, and when it was dry I tried plugging it in. At that time, the keyboard began responding well to caps, scroll, and num lock, and the other keys all made a response too, but multiple incorrect characters came up on the screen with every keystroke.

As far as the Das Keyboard: Everyone that has claimed to me that they have typed on one has said that they loved it. I still have yet to type on one. It was my first runner-up when buying this Unicomp. The Unicomp was chosen over the DK because it was domestically manufactured (that's rare these days for damn near any product), it offered a trackball (which turned out to be not so precise), and had more ergonomic features.

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Old 15th September 2013, 21:51   #35
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/Bump!

Well, there is a big downfall with this thing. It really does ruin one's opinion and comfort on regular rubber-dome keyboards. It's to the point where I am sick of using the one at work, where I'm now ordering a separate Unicomp to bring to work. They won't buy me one (turned my requisition down) since the existing rubber-dome work keyboard works and they're not willing to spend that much on ergonomics, but I'm finally willing to part with the money to get one and bring it to my office. I can understand them not wanting to buy me one - if they did that they'd have to do it for everyone, and that would become expensive. I'm willing to buy my own, but I'll be taking it with me if I ever leave.

I'm going to get a model without the trackball. Not just because it saves me money not to have one, but:

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Originally Posted by rockouthippie View Post
That trackball looks about as useless as tits on a bowling ball.
It mostly is. Because it's old technology, it is incapable of being precise. The one thing I find very useful is not so much the trackball itself, but the mouse buttons accompanying it. Sometimes trying to get an exact pixel click moves the mouse when you depress your finger, so I point with the regular mouse and use the trackball's buttons with my other hand to make the click when I need that exact pixel.

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Old 15th September 2013, 23:19   #36
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I got tired of typing on a shitty keyboard:

http://www.iguanamicro.com/thmemegakekb.html

This is pretty good. I don't know whether there is a giant difference in gaming, but it's really nice for typing. It's very positive, No guessing as whether the key pressed or not. I wonder if this keyboard has a military use. The design is very sturdy. The cable is shielded with a ferrite noise suppressor.

Drone control?
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Old 21st September 2013, 05:44   #37
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When I was researching keyboards, I read a lot of good things about Cherry brand switches. With gaming (or drone control for that matter), I would probably prefer the expanded shape/size/layout for the sake of having the arrow keys in their own little zip code. That said, I could see how some people would prefer a more compact layout for their workstation needs.

To follow along on the military strategy note, personally, I have a Cold War built heavy steel desk/table that has a lot of room for this keyboard, which is also very large and heavy and was also designed during the Cold War. Perhaps I need to update my military strategy someday, but for some reason, I still see the Cold War technology and craftsmanship as fitting my preferences.

This Unicomp is not preferable either for gaming though, because it only allows recognition of up to 4 simultaneous keys. Although it's not frequent to need more than 4, it still happens from time to time. I don't game much, but even on the one I occasionally play, sometimes if I'm checking stats while flying a fighter or dive bomber airplane, it won't work because that can require for than 4 keys (if steering, two arrow for rear elevator flaps and rudder, two left hand directional for allerons and throttle, and tab for stat check window). This can also be true while steering and holding the machine gun key down or dropping bombs (I have it set for shift machine gun and ctrl bomb). So, I usually fly without fighting while using the keyboard exclusively, or, if fighting, my right hand goes for the mouse, where left and right click are machine gun and bomb, and moving the mouse handles the rear controls. With a modern keyboard, I wouldn't have the 4-key limitation, so sometimes I will even use the cheap logitech wireless that I sometimes use as a couch remote control.

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Old 21st September 2013, 14:04   #38
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Really for gaming, the old crappy keyboard was just fine. This one is supposed to have some super-duper sample rate, which obviously I'm not as fast as. You can get a factory wrist rest for these too and I did. Now I can troll at 70 wpm ...

I took a typing class a while ago, and I'm back up to about 70. But uh... can I figure out what to say at 70 wpm? It's sort of like .... zap... now what? Hurry up to wait.

I learned to type in the mid 1970's. It used an IBM selectric mostly. I like being able to fix typos without whiteout. I can probably type nearly as fast on the Logitech I was using, but my accuracy on this keyboard is ten fold improved. No ... did I hit the key right? You probably notice the same thing with your mechanical keyboard. In some ways a typewriter was easier, You'd get a good electric "whack" letting you know the key was hit.

I usually don't drop $100 on a keyboard. If this one lasts a year, it will have saved money. Usually $40 I'm popping for keyboards every few months.
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Old 21st September 2013, 16:32   #39
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I like manual (non-electric) typewriters or computer keyboards. The electric typewriters had too much delay in the keystroke vs. hammer hit, and I had to mentally separate my typing fingers from the sound of the hammers. I had trouble with that. For a three letter word, you'd get "click-whack, click-whack, click-whack", and that slowed me down. If I were deaf, it wouldn't matter so much.

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Old 26th September 2013, 02:42   #40
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You should try a manual typewriter. That's what I learned to type on. Electric typewriters were a luxury... I sweet talked the librarian at school to let me use her electric typewriter.



This is the model I had to learn on. Used it for years. It was war surplus when my dad bought it.
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