Old 20th August 2013, 02:30   #1
swingdjted
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Need a crock pot recipe...

I have a crock pot/deep fryer just like many home kitchens. I've been using it for years, but I want to try something new in it. It's a cheap model, maybe 1.5-2 gallon, just a metal non-stick pot with a heating element attached to the bottom and a selector dial that can be set from "warm" to 400 (Fahrenheit).

My last recipe was pretty simple, insanely salty ham and bean soup (the salt must come from the ham, because I don't add any):

Ingredients:
1.) Ham – 1 pound
2.) bagged dry Great Northern Beans (or navy beans) – 1 pound
3.) 1/3 of a large onion chopped up, or one small onion
4.) 2/3 gallon water
Procedure:
1.) Brown the ham on a skillet.
2.) Pour the ham AND JUICE into slow-cooker, then water, then beans, then onions
3.) Cook on the “warm” setting or just above; otherwise it boils too much
4.) Cook 8 hours or more.
5.) [IMG]file:///C:\Users\DJTED~1\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image002.gif[/IMG]Eat.

It was really good for those of us that tried it, but I could see someone saying it was too salty. I would like to do something more interesting, at least marginally easy, something you yourself have cooked and enjoyed eating, and 'home-cookin' good, but still with readily available ingredients. Is that being demanding? I think some of you enjoy this kind of stuff; I'm hoping to share in that joy.

Bonus points to recipes that can be mason jar canned and/or frozen for longer-term storage and thawed/nuke-at-work reheated, but not required. I can just as easily cook and portion something Sunday and fridge it while eating it throughout the week.

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Old 20th August 2013, 03:11   #2
SSJ4 Gogitta
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[IMG]file:///C:\Users\DJTED~1\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image002.gif[/IMG]Eat.

It's 2013. Did you really jut do that?

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Old 20th August 2013, 03:24   #3
swingdjted
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What the...?

That was just a copy/pasta of a Word document that I followed when I last cooked ham/bean soup from My Documents > Recipes.

Well, at least you know there was an image in there (a pic of it cooked last time I made it), and that it was on my C drive.

Oops.

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Old 20th August 2013, 10:50   #4
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The same recipe with split peas would be good. You probably know, but sp's need to be soaked in water overnight, and it's not a bad idea with beans. Drain and use. I think that's too much ham and perhaps why you think it's too salty. Ham is more of a flavoring than a staple of pea or bean soup. I'd to the same thing with 8oz or ham, or better yet, just the bone out of a picnic ham. I usually bake a ham and then toss the bone in the soup pot with a little meat.

Ham is very salty, you want to make sure you aren't over-salted. You can always add some salt later if it's bland. I'd add salt when served to taste. One thing is, the more you cook the ham, the more it will surrender the salt. So you do want to be well into the cooking before you adjust the salt. I'd also add a minced carrot. Sweetens the soup.

In a pinch, 5 or 6 slices of cooked, drained bacon, slivered is a pretty good seasoning for bean/pea soup too. I also like to toss a few allspice and a couple bay leaf in there. Good for all soups. If you don't want to fish for them when you're done, put them in a tea strainer.

Try this potato soup:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/chef-jo...d-potato-soup/

It's about what I make. Leave the cream out until 20 minutes before serving if you are doing an all day crock pot simmer. Where it talks about flour and butter, remove the browned stuff and actually make a roux . If you get the crock pot revved up good, you can do it in the bottom of the crock pot.

For all soup, I take a medium sized onion and remove the dead layers from it... just stick it in with the soup whole. Only cut it up if you aren't gonna simmer for several hours. Somehow it makes the flavor more savory than chopped onion.

Need quick noodles for chicken/beef soup?

1 egg
6 tablespoons flour.

Mix the two ingredients together. You've got to beat this up with a spoon for a couple of minutes. You'll know you've done it when it gets shiny. That's the gluten being released. Take a tablespoon and spoon off crescent shapes with your thumb into the NOT boiling soup. Maybe 170? If you drop this into boiling soup you'll get egg flowers.

Do this 10 minutes before serving. Just the way grandma used to make it.

The nice thing about this is, it's easy. If you have some good stock in the freezer, you can just heat it up and add drop noodles. I almost prefer these with a good, clear stock, without a lot of veggies. You might want a little chopped celery, but that's about it.

Barszcz (polish Borscht)

2 lbs fresh beets clean. Toss the clean tops in too.
1 onion whole, peeled
1 quart water
2 cups stock (pork/beef/chicken/vegetable) Pork recommended.
2 bay leaf
6 Allspice
Salt to taste.
2 cloves garlic whole.

Toss all that in the crock pot and let it go for a few hours. When done, strain all the solids out of the soup and you'll get a wonderful clear, red broth. Serve with a dollop of sour cream and good bread. Make sure the soup is cool enough or the sour cream will curdle. A little below simmer.

I think it's only an excuse to eat sour cream, but it is good

Just like Great grandma Zosha used to make.

Last edited by rockouthippie; 20th August 2013 at 11:59.
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Old 21st August 2013, 00:28   #5
fc*uk
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My US unit conversions blow... I want to say 4 quarts to a gallon... So yeah... your crockpot might be big enough...

You have my guarantee you will eat your arm on both days 1 and 2.

Upon looking at this, it did not transfer from my old recipe program very well... I think you get the idea.
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File Type: pdf cassoulet.pdf (26.4 KB, 223 views)
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Old 22nd August 2013, 14:09   #6
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^Wow... I could feel my arteries clogging up just reading the recipe



Ratatouille is pretty good in a crock pot.



Stew is pretty good too. I really like pot roast for the meat when it's been cooked all day until it falls apart. Corned beef and cabbage is good with an all day simmer.

Another thing that is killer in a crock pot is Irish lamb stew:

http://www.food.com/recipe/tradition...-barley-293122

I love lamb stew with barley. Really sticks to your ribs.

Or a Basque stew:

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/basque_lamb_stew/

Homemade chili is another choice for slow cookers. Yum.

Just plain pot roast with some garlic, carrots, celery and spuds tossed in there is pretty edible. Just flop the roast in the crock pot toss some season salt on it. Hi for a half hour to put a skin on the roast. Low all day. An hour or a little more before serving, remove the roast, add 1/2 inch of water, and a teaspoon of corn starch. Deglaze the pot. Put the roast back in, turn the crock pot up so you get some nice steam and let the vegetables steam until they are tender. A little pot roast, a little gravy. How could a guy go wrong?

Another thing I've used a crock pot for. If you're partying, taking some water and boiling up a bunch of hot dogs gives your guests something hot and good. Hot dogs, the longer they simmer, the better they get. I usually do a pot of hot dogs for Superbowl. The nice thing is that you can fire up 3 or 4 packages at once and hand people a fork to go fishing. It's not a bad deal for picnic either. My crock pot is ceramic, so hot dogs will stay hot for a couple hours if you toss a towel over it.

Now I'm hungry. Time for breakfast.
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Old 23rd August 2013, 00:30   #7
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Search for "crock pot taco soup" or "slow cooker taco soup"... There's several variations on it. My gf made some (don't know which recipe), and it was DERICIOUS. I'll see if I can track down her recipe.
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Old 23rd August 2013, 12:48   #8
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This one doesn't need the crock pot:

2 lbs frozen brocoli
1 lb Velveeta
1 chopped onion
3 Cans cream of mushroom soup
2 Cans cream of chicken soup
3 cans condensed milk
3 tbps butter.

Saute the onion in butter until it's clear. Melt the cheese over low heat, then stir the rest in and let it simmer slow for a half hour or an hour.

I duno about you, but any excuse to eat broccoli. Cauliflower works good too.
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